UPDATE: Era, Callisburg Bonds Lose; state property tax changes pass | Education

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A pair of school building bonds failed and several local school board seats were filled in Saturday’s election, according to preliminary results released by the Cooke County Clerk’s Office.

Era ISD’s $12.7 proposal to renovate some classroom spaces and bring its buildings up to code was rejected, 130-175.

Callisburg’s more ambitious $28 million bid to upgrade its education spaces and sports facilities also failed, with each of its three bond proposals rejected: A – 658-691, B – 527-825 and C-537-815.

The Callisburg ISD School Board will weigh its options at its May 16 meeting.

“While we are disappointed with the final results, we understand the need to move forward to support the needs of our students and staff to the best of our abilities,” Superintendent Donald Metzler told the Register.

“Rising inflation and the latest 2022 property valuations released May 2 have been difficult to overcome. The district will move forward with plans to replace older HVAC units” using the general fund and d ‘other funds available,’ Metzler added.

As for school board races:

• Eric Vann beat Jeannie Alexander in Valley View Seat 6, 421-148;

• Charlie Pickett defeated Corrine French in Seat 1 of Valley View, 390-174;

• Chad Fleitman (259) and Brian Neu (213) won the two vacant Lindsay board seats over Bradley Ice (87);

• Phil Neelley beat Karen Denise Manuel, 480-192, for place 6 on the Gainesville field;

• Laura Otts won Place 5 in Gainesville with 528 votes, easily outpacing the rest of this group of four;

• Corey Hardin won the Place 7 seat of Gainesvile, unopposed.

Just under 13% of Cooke County’s 28,000 registrants turned out to vote.

Amendments

Texas voters overwhelmingly approved two state constitutional amendments in the election, according to data from the secretary of state.

Both amendments joined a ballot in municipal elections held across the state on Saturday. These amendments are part of the Texas Legislature’s ongoing push against rising property taxes. With 100% of polling stations declared, 86.91% of voters were in favor of Proposition 1 while 84.82% were in favor of Proposition 2. The results remain unofficial until viewed. .

The first proposal sets a lower property tax rate for elderly and disabled homeowners.

Because these 65+ or disabled residents have a cap on their school property taxes, they did not benefit from the property tax reductions passed in 2019. This amendment would allow these individuals to also benefit from the school property tax rates. reduced taxes.

To account for lost property tax revenue, the state would then be required to reimburse public school districts, according to a law passed with the proposed amendment.

The second amendment seeks to increase the amount of the homestead exemption in public school taxes from $25,000 to $40,000.

Currently, local taxing entities such as cities, counties, and school districts collect property taxes and set tax rates, with the bulk generally going to school districts. But property tax relief does not guarantee a lower tax bill.

Gov. Greg Abbott called the results “a victory for ALL Texas property owners,” on Twitter.

Ali Linan of CNHI’s office at the Texas Statehouse contributed to this report.

A pair of school building bonds failed and several local school board seats were filled in Saturday’s election, according to unofficial results released by the Cooke County Clerk’s Office.

Era ISD’s $12.7 proposal to renovate some classroom spaces and bring its buildings up to code was rejected, 130-175.

Callisburg ISD’s more ambitious $28 million bid to upgrade its education spaces and sports facilities also failed, with each of its three bond proposals rejected: A-658-691, B-527- 825 and C-537-815.

As for school board races:

• Eric Vann beat Jeannie Alexander in Valley View Seat 6, 421-148;

• Charlie Pickett defeated Corrine French in Seat 1 of Valley View, 390-174;

• Chad Fleitman (259) and Brian Neu (213) won the two vacant Lindsay board seats over Bradley Ice (87);

• Phil Neelley beat Karen Denise Manuel, 480-192, for place 6 on the Gainesville field;

• Laura Otts won Place 5 in Gainesville with 528 votes, easily outpacing the rest of this group of four;

• Corey Hardin won the Place 7 seat of Gainesvile, unopposed.

Just under 13% of Cooke County’s 28,000 registered voters turned out to vote, which also included two proposed amendments to the state constitution.

These amendments — one would cap the property taxes that school districts could impose on elderly or disabled homeowners and the other would increase the state’s exemption on property taxes from $25,000 to $40,000 per year — each has passed easily, with more than 85% of the votes. in Cooke County.

Texas voters statewide overwhelmingly approved the amendments, according to data from the secretary of state.

To account for the loss of property tax revenue resulting from the new cap, the state will be required to reimburse public school districts, according to a law passed with the proposed amendment.

Currently, local taxing entities such as cities, counties, and school districts collect property taxes and set tax rates, with the bulk generally going to school districts. But property tax relief does not guarantee a lower tax bill.

Gov. Greg Abbott called the results “a victory for ALL Texas property owners,” on Twitter.

In November, Texans also voted in favor of eight state constitutional amendments. These covered several issues, including one that solidified caregiver visits to nursing homes.

Read Tuesday’s record for more on Saturday’s results.

Ali Linan of CNHI contributed to this report.

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